Games Directory

This is a listing of games that are played currently on the Price is Right.  This list is as complete as possible but if you find any omissions or errors, feel free to contact us.

Any Number – A game played for a car, a player is offered two prizes, a car (5 digits) along with a less expensive prize (i.e.  flatware, furniture – 3 digits), and a piggy bank (3 digits – ex. $3.72).  The player is given the first number in the car and has all the remaining numbers (0-9) to choose from to fill the vacant digits in the car.  Whichever prize is filled first, is the prize the contestant receives.

Balance Game – The contestant is shown a prize and a large scale. A bag which has the weight of a certain price is to the right of the scale.  The contestant is also shown four other bags, each bearing money amounts on their fronts. One bag has the last three digits of the prize’s price (e.g., $268) on it; it is immediately placed on the left side of the scale. The other three bags have multiples of $1,000 on them (e.g., $1,000, $3,000, and $6,000).  The contestant selects two of the bags to place alongside the three-digit bag, thus forming his/her bid on the prize (e.g., placing $1,000 and $6,000 with the $268 bag would mean the contestant’s bid is $7,188). The unmarked bag is then placed on the right side of the scale; if the scale balances, the contestant wins the prize.

Barker’s Bargain Bar – There are two prizes offered in this game such as a grandfather clock and a dinette group.  On both prizes, there is a bargain price meaning it is lower than the actual retail price.  The contestant is to choose which prize has a bargain price that is more below the actual retail price.  The contestant wins if he/she chooses the better bargain.

Barker’s Markers – In this game, there are 3 prizes shown. There are 4 prices and the contestant is given $500 to start the game. The contestant is to choose 3 of the prices and then 2 of the correct prices that he/she has chosen are shown. There are always at least 2 correct prices. Then, the contestant must choose whether to leave the remaining marker on the price that he/she chose or to give Bob the $500 to change it. If the contestant loses, then he/she loses the $500 as well. If the contestant gives the $500 back and makes the change and ends up winning, then he/she does not get the $500 back, but still wins the prizes. The contestant gets to keep the $500 if he/she decides to keep it and ends up having all 3 prices right. In that case, all 3 prizes are won along with the $500.

Bonkers – There is a 4-digit price displayed for the offered prize. All of the listed numbers to the price are wrong. The contestant is to determine whether each number is higher or lower than the listed number. The contestant is to use the 4 paddles and place each paddle either above or below the numbers. The contestant has 30 seconds to get the price right and is allowed to make as many changes as he/she can make within the 30 seconds of time in order to get the price correct. If the contestant gets the price correct, then he/she wins the prize.

Bonus Game – Four incorrect small prizes ($10-$100) are given and the player must choose ‘higher or lower’.  After getting a correct choice of ‘higher’ or ‘lower’ one section of a lighted board will illuminate (there is one section for each prize).  If the board reveals “BONUS” the contestant receives another, more valuable prize.

Bulls-Eye – 5 “grocery” prizes are given to the contestant who must choose a prize and then tell how many of the chosen prize will total $10-$12.  If the total price is not in the “bulls-eye”, but less than $10 the player receives a marker on the board.  The player has three chances to get between 10 and 12 dollars, but if they fail, they can still be victorious if a bulls-eye is found to be behind a grocery prize’s price, and a marker for that item was on the board for being less than $10.

Buy or Sell – Three prizes are shown. The prices that are displayed are not the actual prices of the prizes. The contestant is to sell the prizes that he/she feels have a price they think is high and to buy the items that he/she feels are priced too low. The goal is to have a profit of at least $1. If that is accomplished, then the contestant wins. If the contestant manages to make all of the correct moves, then he/she gets all of the profit as cash. Example, if the contestant has a $1,000 profit after the prizes are bought or sold, and then he/she wins the $1,000 and the 3 prizes.

Card Game – Another game played for a car in which a contestant first draws out of a deck of prices ranging from $500-$2000.  The card drawn is the amount the contestant can miss the car without going over.  A digital screen showing a price is started with $10,000 and the contestant then draws cards out of a 52 card standard deck.  For each face card, $1000 is added to the price on the screen, and for each numbered card, the number times $100 is added to the screen (ex.  a King of Diamonds is worth $1000 while a 6 of Clubs is worth $600).  All aces are wild which allows the contestant to choose any value of his or her choice to come within their allotted amount away from the car’s actual retail price.  Bob then reveals the price and the contestant wins if the price shown on the screen (determined by the cards) is within their range from the beginning of the game without going over.

Check Game – In this game, the contestant is offered a prize such as a trip.  The contestant is to write a check for a certain value such as $2000.  Then, the price of the prize is shown and that price is added to the amount that the contestant wrote on the check and if the total is between $5000 and $6000, the contestant wins.

Checkout – In this game, there are 5 grocery items shown.  The contestant is to estimate the value of each.  The contestant’s estimated total value of the products must be within $1 of the actual retail total value of the products in order to win.

Clearance Sale – There are 3 prizes offered in this game. The contestant is given 3 sales prices and must put them so each prize has a sales price. The sale for the 2nd item must be greater than the sale of the 1st item and the sale for the 3rd item must be greater than the 2nd item in order to win. Example: If the sales price put on the 1st item, which would be the least expensive item was $1,000 and the actual price was $1,500, the difference is $500. Then, the sales price put on the 2nd item is $1,600, then the actual price of the 2nd price cannot be less than $2,100. If the sales prices are placed correctly, then the contestant wins the 3 prizes. If anything is wrong, the contestant wins nothing.

Cliffhangers – A game with a mountain with 25 steps and a mountain climber who starts at the bottom.  Their are three inexpensive prizes (less than $100) and the player must try to guess the actual prize of these items.  For each dollar he/she is off on the item, the mountain climber moves one step.  After 25 steps (or a combined total of $25 on all three prizes) the climber will tumble from the mountain.  If the climber does not fall off, the contestant wins a more valuable prize.

Clock Game – A analog clock has a starting time of 30 seconds.  A contestant has a chance to win two prizes, and wins each one by correctly guessing the prize’s price.  This is accomplished as the player says a price and Bob says whether the actual price is ‘higher’ or ‘lower.’  The clock is stopped after the first price is guessed and starts again at the same spot for the next price.  Therefore the contestant has 30 total seconds to win both prizes, and if this is accomplished, the contestant also receives a $1000 bonus.

Coming or GoingIt holds a number that can reveal two different 4 digit prices, depending on which way a flat board (like a seesaw) is tipped (they are the reverse of one another). Bob asks if the contestant is “coming” or “going.” He will show that if they are “coming” (tips board one way) the numbers slide back to reveal one price, and if they’re “going” (tips board the other way) the numbers slide back to reveal a different order and price. Then he will reset the game board and reduce the numbers back to one number. The contestant tells us if he is “coming” or “going” and moves the tip-table game board in the proper direction to creat the price of the prize.

Cover Up – This game is played for a car. A completely wrong price is shown and the contestant must cover up the wrong numbers with the right numbers. The contestant has a choice of 2 numbers to cover up the 1st number, 3 to cover up the 2nd, 4 to cover up the 3rd, 5 to cover up the 4th, and 6 to cover up the 5th. After all of the wrong numbers are covered, Bob asks if the price that the contestant made with the numbers is correct. If the price ends up being wrong (most people don’t win on the very 1st try), then Bob asks if any of the numbers are correct. Then, the numbers that are correct light up. The contestant must change the wrong numbers and use different numbers. The game continues until the contestant fails to get anymore numbers right or manages to get the price of the car right and of course in the event of all the numbers being right, the contestant wins the car.

Credit Card – The contestant is shown 5 prizes. Then, the contestant inserts the credit card into the ATM-like machine slot. Then, the credit limit shows up on the screen. The contestant is to choose 3 of the 5 prizes that total less than the credit limit. There is only 1 possible combination. If the contestant chooses the correct prizes, then he/she wins all 5 prizes. If any of the wrong prizes are chosen, then the contestant wins nothing.

Danger Price – A danger price is given along with four prizes and the contestant must pick the three prizes that are not the danger price.

Dice Game – This game is played for a car.  There are 5 digits in the price of the car.  The contestant is given the 1st digit and will roll 4 die, 1 at a time in order to try and determine the next 4 digits.  There are no zeroes in the price and no digits higher than 6.  After each die is rolled, Bob will ask if the contestant rolled the right number.  If the right number is rolled, the digit will light up both on the top and bottom rows.  If the number is wrong, the buzzer goes off and Bob asks the contestant if the number is higher or lower and the contestant answers.  If the contestant gets all of the numbers right, he/she wins the car.

Double Prices – In this game, two price tags are shown and one prize such as a trip is offered.  The contestant must choose which price tag displays the price of the prize.  If the correct price is chosen, the contestant wins.

Easy As 1-2-3 – The contestant is shown 3 different prizes. Then, 3 blocks are brought out to the contestant and the contestant is to arrange the blocks on the prizes from least expensive to most expensive (1 being the least expensive and 3 being the most expensive). If the blocks are on the correct prizes, then the contestant wins all of the prizes.

Five Price Tags – In this game, the offered prize is a car.  The contestant has a chance to win up to 4 chances to guess the price of the car.  The contestant must tell whether the given price of an item such as a mop, board game, etc. is true or false.  If the contestant fails to get any of the true-false prices correct, then the game is over.  The contestant wins the car if he/she is able to guess the correct price.

Flip Flop – There is a 4-digit prize offered in this game. There are 2 sets of 2-digit numbers lined up next to each other. The price that the numbers make before any changes are made is wrong so the contestant can’t just leave the price alone. The contestant has a choice to either Flip (change the first pair of numbers), Flop (change the 2nd pair of numbers), or Flip Flop (change both pairs of numbers). Example: If the displayed price is $3825, the contestant can change the 38 to 83 by flipping, change the 25 to 52 by flopping, or change 3825 to 8352 by Flip Flopping. If the price is correct after changes are made, then the contestant wins the prize.

Freeze Frame – This game is played for a prize such as a trip. There are 8 different sets of 2-digit numbers shown and they go around in a clockwise manner. There are 4 numbers in the frame at a time. The contestant is to stop the numbers when he/she believes the numbers in the frame are the price of the prize. If the contestant stops the numbers when the correct ones are in the frame, then he/she wins the prize.

Golden Road – When this game is played, it is always the first game played on the show.  The first item is something with a value of less than $1 such as a can of soup.  Bob takes the price tag from the less than $1 item and the contestant is shown a prize that is usually valued between $500 and $900.  The 2nd and 3rd numbers of the price are given and out of the 2 numbers from the price tag of the less than $1 item, the contestant must pick one of those numbers.  One of the numbers is the first number of the prize and the other number is not.  If the contestant chooses the correct number, Bob takes the price tag of the prize and the contestant looks at a prize with 4 digits for the price.  Then, using the numbers from the prize with 3 digits that he/she won, he/she must choose the 2nd number of the 4-digit prize.  If the contestant is correct again, then Bob takes the price of the 4-digit prize and then Bob tells the contestant that the prize is worth over a certain amount of thousands of dollars.  The prize is usually over $60,000.  The 5-digit prize is a luxury car, yacht, etc. Then, Bob reveals 4 digits of the price and the contestant must guess what the 3rd number in the price is using the numbers from the 4-digit prize.  If the contestant guesses correctly, he/she wins all of the prizes.

Grand Game – The contestant has a chance to win up to $10,000, but must start off with only $1.  There are 6 grocery items and a target price is shown.  The contestant must choose the 4 products that are less than the target price in order to win the $10,000.  The contestant is offered the option of quitting at $1,000.

Grocery Game – There are 5 grocery items shown and described to the contestant by Rod.  The contestant must buy between $20 and $21 worth of grocery items.  The items can be bought in any quantity that the contestant chooses.  This game is played for items such as a couch, bed, etc.

Half OffPlayed for $10,000 in cash. The contestant is shown 16 closed gift boxes in which one has $10,000. In order to win the money the player must pick the box that has the money in it. To increase the player’s chances of choosing the correct box with the money, a small game is played that will help the player eliminate the boxes that are empty. The small game consists of showing the player two small prizes. Each prize has a price on it. However, one prize has its correct price on it, and the other has a price that is one-half its correct price. If the player can identify which price is the one that is “half off,” then the show will eliminate half of the gift boxes. Only boxes that are empty are eliminated. This leaves eight boxes behind of which one has the money in it. This small game is repeated two more times. Potentially, if the player is correct each time, two boxes will remain. Then the player chooses which box to take.

HI-LO – There are 6 grocery items.  The contestant is to choose the 3 highest priced items.  Then, the remaining 3 items must have a lower price than the lowest price in the “HI” row in order to win.  For example, if the lowest priced item in the “HI” row is $4.79, the remaining items must all be less than $4.79 in order to win.

Hole in One (or two) – In this game, 6 grocery items are described to the contestant by Rod.  The contestant is to attempt to put the items in order (from least expensive to most expensive).  If the contestant puts all of the items in the correct order, he/she gets to do a mini-golf putt from the front line, which is around 1 foot away from the hole and wins a $500 bonus.  For each correctly placed item, the contestant is allowed to place the ball 1 line closer to the hole.  Bob does an inspiration putt from the line furthest from the hole each time the game is played and usually makes it.  The prize for winning this game is a car.

It’s In The Bag – Contestant has a chance to win up to $16,000. There are 5 grocery bags and price tags in front of the bags. Out of the 6 grocery items that are shown to the contestant, he/she is to choose which items are in the corresponding grocery bags. Example: If the price tag says $1.99, the contestant is to put the item he/she thinks is $1.99 by that bag. The contestant is offered the option of quitting and taking the money that he/she has already won. If all of the items are correctly placed, then the contestant wins $16,000. If the contestant decides to continue and ends up being wrong, then he/she does not win any money at all. Each move forward is a double or nothing gamble.

Joker – There is a row of 5 cards that are standing so the contestant can see the backs of the cards, therefore the contestant can’t see what cards actually are. There are four 2-digit prizes shown to the contestant and he/she is to guess the prices of the items. There are 2 possible prices for each item. Example: either $25 or $52. For each price the contestant gets correct, he/she is able to choose a card from the row and the chosen cards are placed face down on the table. After the contestant is finished choosing cards, the cards are looked at 1 by 1. If the joker was chosen, then the contestant wins the offered prize.

Let ‘Em Roll – This game is played for a car. The way of winning the car is basically the same as getting a Yahtzee. The contestant gets 1 free roll and has a chance to win 2 more rolls. There are 3 grocery items described to the contestant. The price of the 1st item is revealed and the contestant must tell if the 2nd item is higher or lower in price than the 1st. If correct, the contestant gets a 2nd roll. Then, the contestant must tell whether the 3rd item is higher or lower in price than the 2nd. If correct, the contestant gets a 3rd roll. There are 5 die used in this game. On 3 sides of the die, there is a car. On the other 3 sides, there is a $500 space, a $1,000 space, and a $1,500 space. The contestant has the option of quitting after either of the first 2 rolls if he/she wants to and taking the money. Example, if all 5 die ended up on $1,500, then the contestant can quit and would take $7,500. If the contestant gets all 5 dies to land on cars within the 3 rolls, then he/she wins the car.

Line ‘Em Up – In this game, a car is the prize offered. There are two 3-digit prizes and a 2-digit prize in this game as well. The 1st and last numbers of the car are given. The prices of the other 3 items are lined up vertically between the first and last numbers of the car. The contestant is to slide one of the numbers from each of the 3 prizes into the row with the price of the car. The contestant has 2 chances to get the price of the car right. If the contestant gets the price right, he/she wins the car and the other 3 prizes.

Lucky Seven – Usually when this game is played, it is the first game played on the show the day it’s played.  The prize offered is a car.  The contestant is given the 1st number in the price of the car and $7.  For the next 4 numbers, the contestant must give away $1 for each number they miss the digit by.  Example, if the contestant misses by $4, they must give $4.  If the contestant has at least $1 left at the end of the game, then he/she wins the car.

Magic # – There are two prizes offered in this game, one prize being more expensive than the other. The price value of the prizes usually ranges between $1,000 and $2,500. The contestant is to use the lever by the screen displaying the magic number and set the number to a price higher than the less expensive prize and lower than the more expensive prize. Example: If the prizes are $1,250 and $2,300, the contestant is to set the magic number between those two values. If the contestant sets the magic number to a price between the prices of the two prizes, then the contestant wins both prizes.

Make Your Move – There are 3 prizes offered in this game. One prize is a 2-digit prize, another prize is a 3-digit prize, and the 3rd prize is a 4-digit prize, such as a trip. There are 3 different small boards that are labeled for the prizes that the contestant must line up under the correct numbers for the price to the corresponding item. There are no overlapping prizes and all the numbers must be used. If the contestant puts the boards under the correct numbers for each prize, then he/she wins the prizes.

Master Key – In this game, there are 3 prizes offered.  First, there are 2 small items such as a cleaning kit or mop described to the contestant.  Then, for each prize the contestant must tell which of the 2 prices of the item is correct.  If the contestant gets both correct, then he/she wins 2 keys and chooses 2 of the 5 keys.  There is a key that opens nothing, 1 key for each of the 3 prizes, and the Master Key and if the contestant gets the Master Key, then he/she will win all 3 prizes.  After the keys have been chosen, the contestant goes down to the 3 keyholes.  Each of the 3 keyholes is for a different prize.  The prize it’s for is indicated above.  The contestant takes one of the keys and inserts it into each of the prizes.  The contestant wins whichever prizes he/she unlocks.  If the prize is unlocked, a red sign with the word “WIN” comes up in the window above the keyhole.

Money Game – This game is played for a car, truck, or a van usually.  There are 9 different 2-digit numbers shown.  The contestant is given the 3rd number in the price of the vehicle.  Then, the contestant must pick both the 1st two numbers and the last two numbers in the price.  Behind the 1st two numbers, there is a design of the front of the vehicle and behind the last two numbers, there is a design of the back of the vehicle.  Behind the other seven 2-digit numbers, there is a money sign ($).  If four 2-digit numbers with money signs behind them are chosen, then the contestant wins the amount of money that the numbers total. Example:  if 75, 53, 86, and 95 are chosen and all have money signs, then the contestant wins the total of those numbers, which is $309.

More or Less – Contestant is shown wrong price and must guess whether correct price is higher or lower.  Game is progressive, so if person gets first price right, they move on to the next price and so on, until they either miss a price, or win the big prize at the end of the ladder.

Most Expensive – Three prizes are shown.  The contestant must pick which prize is the most expensive.  If the most expensive prize is chosen, the contestant wins all 3 prizes.  If wrong, the contestant wins nothing.

Now or Then – There are 6 grocery items, each on a slice of a wheel.  The prices listed for each item are for the item now (present price) or then (which would be a time such as January of 1990)  The contestant must get 3 items in a row correctly.  The items are arranged in a hexagonal manner so the contestant can get 3 in a row in a few different ways.  The contestant is to tell whether the listed price for the item is the price now or the price for the time that they have listed as then.  If the contestant gets 3 items in a row correct, then he/she wins the offered prize.

One Away – This game is played for a car.  Each of the 5 numbers are off by 1.  The contestant is to make each number either 1 higher or 1 lower.  Example: if there’s an 8, the number has to be made either a 9 or a 7.  After the contestant changes all of the numbers, he/she asks “ladies do I have at least 1 number right?”  If the horn beeps that means there is at least 1 number right and the game continues.  The contestant continues to ask the ladies if he/she has 2, 3, 4, or all 5 numbers right until the horn doesn’t beep.  If there are any numbers wrong, the contestant must change the amount of numbers that are wrong.  After the changes are made, the correct numbers are revealed 1 by 1.  If the contestant’s price matches the actual price, then he/she wins the car.  The easiest way to win this game would be to only get the 1st number right and then change the next 4 numbers.

One Right Price – The contestant plays for two prizes such as trips in this game.  A price tag is shown and the contestant must tell which prize the price tag corresponds to.  If correct, the contestant wins both prizes.

One Wrong Price – There are 3 prizes shown. One of the prizes has the wrong price listed. The contestant is to choose which prize has the wrong price on it. If the contestant chooses the prize with the wrong price, then he/she wins all 3 prizes.

Pass The Buck – This game is played for a car. First, the contestant is shown 2 grocery items. One of the items has the correct price and the other item has a price listed that is $1 under the actual price. Moving the Buck either left or right to add $1 to the price of one of the grocery items, the contestant is to determine which price is $1 under the actual price. At first, the contestant had to do this for 3 different pairs of items in order to win 3 chances to remove a number from the board. There were 8 numbers when this game started and now there are 6. The contestant is given 1 free number and only has to determine the prices for 2 pairs of grocery items. On the board now, behind 2 numbers there is lose everything, there is a car behind 1 number, $1,000 behind another number, $3,000 behind a number, and $5,000 behind the remaining number. The contestant wins whatever turns up behind the numbers he/she chooses, unless of course the contestant picks a lose everything last. Then, he/she loses everything that had been won up to that point.

Pathfinder – The prize in this game is a car.  The contestant starts on the 1st number of the car, which is in the middle of a “5×5 grid”.  Then, the contestant is to attempt to move to the next number of the car.  The next number is either the number in front of the contestant, the number in back, the number to the left, or the number to the right.  The contestant keeps moving until he/she gets a number wrong.  Then, he/she must try to win another chance to move by guessing the price of 1 of 3 different 2-digit prizes such as a boom box.  If the contestant manages to step on all 5 of the numbers in the price of the car, then he/she wins the car.

Penny Ante – There are 2 grocery items, each of which have 4 different prices listed.  The contestant is given 3 pennies.  Each wrong price chosen costs 1 penny.  If the contestant is to choose the 2 correct prices for the grocery items without using 3 pennies, then he/she wins.

Pick A Number – There is a 4-digit prize shown. The price for the prize is shown, but one number is missing. There are 3 different numbers shown and the contestant is to choose one of the numbers to make the 4th number of the prize. If the contestant picks the correct number, then he/she wins the prize.

Pick a Pair – There are 6 grocery items shown.  The contestant is to pick 2 of the items that have the same price.  If the contestant fails to do that on the 1st try, then he/she can keep one of the products that was chosen so far or start over and pick 2 new products.  If the contestant chooses 2 products with the same price, he/she wins the prize that’s offered.

Plinko – The most popular game on The Price is Right.  Bob gives the contestant 1 Plinko chip and the contestant has a chance to win up to 4 more chips.  There are four 2-digit prizes shown and the contestant is to tell whether the number on the left is the 1st number in the price or the number on the right is the last number.  Example: if you see a 1 and an 8, the price is not $18.  Either the 1 is the 1st number or the 8 is the last number.  The contestant has a chance to win up to $10,000 with each chip so with 5 chips, the contestant can win up to $50,000.  That has never happened before.  The Plinko Board is kind of like a pegboard, and the chips bounce off random pegs until they reach the bottom and fall in slots that correspond with selected amounts of money.  On the board, there are two $100 slots, two $500 slots, two $1,000 slots, two $0 slots, and one $10,000 slot.  The middle slot used to be $5,000 and is worth $20,000 on the primetime specials.  The contestant holds 1 chip at a time against the board and lets it go.  After all of the chips have been released and landed in the slots, the total amounts are added up and the contestant walks away with a certain amount of money.

Pocket Change – The contestant is spotted 25 cents, which is the beginning cost of a car. He is shown a board containing six digits and five spaces for the car’s price; five of the digits belong in the car’s price, one is an extra.  After the first digit of the car is placed in the car’s price, the contestant is asked to select the second number in the price from the remaining digits. If he is correct, he may choose one of 20 pouches on the gameboard, and play proceeds to the third digit (with only the remaining selections still in play). However, if he/she is incorrect, the asking price of the car increases by 25 cents. Play continues in like manner until all five numbers in the car’s price are displayed. If the contestant guesses the entire price without making a mistake, he/she immediately wins the car; otherwise, the person has a chance to “buy” the car (at asking price) with their “pocket change”– each of the pouches taken off the board have a monetary value somewhere between $0 and $2.00 with $.10 being the most frequent.

Poker Game – In this game, four prizes are offered.  Using the prizes, the contestant is to choose 2 of the prizes and a poker hand is made.  The goal is to get the best possible poker hand.  If the contestant fails to get a poker hand that he/she likes, then he/she may pass the hand to the house and use the other two prizes to make a hand.  If the contestant ends up with the better hand than the house, then the contestant wins all 4 prizes.  Example of making a poker hand:  lets say one prize is $999 and the other is $665.  That would make three 9s and two 6s and that is a full house.

Punch-a-Bunch – 4 small prizes are offered ($10-$100) with incorrect prices.  A contestant earns one “punch” for every time they correctly guess whether the correct price is higher or lower than the given price.  The contestant then moves to a giant punchboard to use his/her punches.  There are 50 holes in the board and  each hole contains either $50, $100, $250, $500, $1000, $5000, or $10000.  The contestant punches out the holes he/she won and Bob pulls out the slip of paper that has the amount of prize money listed.  After each time Bob reveals the prize, the contestant can either keep the prize or give it back.  On the board, there are four of the lowest prizes that have the designation of “Second Chance.”  This allows the contestant to punch another hole and they add the prizes of those two holes together.

Push Over – Usually, this game is played for a prize such as a trip, but sometimes it has been played for a car. There is a row of blocks with numbers on them. Somewhere in the row of blocks, the price of the prize is in order and the contestant is to keep pushing blocks off of the row and into the box next to the row of blocks until the price of the prize is in the frame. If the contestant gets the price of the prize into the frame, then he/she wins the prize.

Race Game – Four prizes are offered (sofa, furniture, golf clubs, etc.) and there are four price tags on a rack nearby.  The contestant must place the price tags on which prize he/she feels is the same amount as listed on the price tag.  The contestant then must run back to a giant, retro-looking screen, and pull a lever, which shows how many prizes are correct.  A contestant can make as many changes as he/she wants in a 45-second time window.

Range Game – A classic game, a $600 spread between prizes is shown, and a $150 red “range” is also on the set.  The “range” moves up the $600 spread until the contestant feels that the actual price of the prize offered is in the red “range,” at which point he presses a large red button to stop the range.  If the actual retail price was inside the “range,” the contestant wins.

Safe Crackers – A large prize (sofa, furniture, trip, etc.) is combined with a three-digit prize.  A contestant wins by correctly determining the price of the three-digit prize.  Each number in the three-digit prize has three choices, and if the number is correct, the contestant wins both prizes.

Secret X – Game played like tic-tac-toe.  There is a “hidden X” in the middle, vertical row, and the contestant has a chance to use three X’s to make a tic-tac-toe with the middle squares.  Contestants are given a free X and must win two more.  Two prizes are given, with two prices, and the contestant must correctly guess which price is correct (hence, the two other X’s)  If the Secret X that is revealed, makes a tic tac toe with any of the contestants other squares he/she wins.

Shell Game – A red ball is hidden under four shells, a contestant earns the chance to win 4 choices of which shell the ball is under.  The contestant gets these choices by guessing higher/lower on four incorrect prizes.  If the shell is under one of the shells the contestant chose, then he/she receives a larger prize.  If the person wins all four small prizes so that all the shells have been chosen, Bob also offers the contestant a $500 bonus if he/she can correctly identify the shell the ball resides under.

Shopping Spree – There are 4 prizes shown. The contestant is to spend more than an allotted amount shown by purchasing 3 of the 4 prizes. It is basically the opposite of “Credit Card.” If the contestant manages to spend more than the allotted amount, then he/she wins all 4 prizes.

Side By Side – There is a 4-digit prize such a trip offered in this game. There are 2 sets of 2-digit numbers and the contestant is to put one of the sets on the left side or the right side of the other set, therefore making that set either the 1st 2 digits or the last 2 digits of the price. If the contestant puts the digits in the correct place, the price lights up and he/she wins the prize. If not, the word “sorry” lights up and he/she loses.

Spelling Bee – The offered prize in this game is a car.  There are 30 numbered cards.  Eleven of those have a C, 11 have an A, 6 have an R, and 2 of the cards have the word “car” on them.  The contestant is given 2 free cards of his/her choice.  Then, there are three 2-digit prizes offered and the contestant is to attempt to guess the price of the items.  If he/she is within $10 of the actual price, then the item is won along with another card.  If the contestant is to get one of the prizes exactly right, then he/she wins all 3 prizes, even if he/she already missed 2 of the prizes by more than $10.  After all of the cards are chosen, the contestant has the choice of either going for the car or quitting and taking the money.  Each card that hasn’t been viewed is worth $500 so the contestant can walk away with up to $2,500.  If the chosen cards spell car or if one of the chosen cards says car, then the contestant wins the car.  If all of the cards are turned over and car is not spelled, then the contestant doesn’t win anything.

Squeeze Play – Contestant is offered a four-digit prize (trip, motorcycle, etc.).  There is a board that shows a five-digit prize.  To win the contestant must remove one of the middle three numbers, and the remaining four digits “squeeze” together to form, hopefully, the correct four-digit price.

Stack the Deck – The contestant is shown seven numbered cards for a car with a five-digit price. The contestant must choose the digits in the price of the car in order. However, before picking numbers, the contestant is given an opportunity to “stack the deck” in his favor and be given up to three numbers in their correct positions.  The contestant is shown a pair of grocery items and a price, and must choose which product matches that price (a la 1 Right Price). If successful, the contestant may choose any number in the price of the car to be revealed. There are three pairs of items, so up to three numbers may be revealed.  After the three prices have been guessed, the contestant fills in the remaining slots using the remaining cards. Once all five digits in the car price are guessed, the correct price is revealed; if all of the digits are right, the contestant wins the car. Otherwise, s/he loses.

Step Up – There are 4 prizes offered in this game. The idea in this game is for the contestant to pick the prizes in order from least expensive to most expensive. After the first prize is chosen, the contestant is given the choice to step up and try to win $500. If the contestant picks a prize more expensive than the previous prize that he/she chose, then he/she wins the prize and $500. Then, the contestant has a choice of stepping up again and trying to win $1,000. If a more expensive prize than the previous one is chosen, then the contestant wins the prize he/she just chose along with $1,000 for a total of $1,500 at the moment. Then, the contestant has a choice of stepping up yet again for a chance to win another $1,500 for a total of $3,000. If the remaining prize is more expensive than the previous prizes, then the contestant wins all 4 prizes along with $3,000. The contestant is offered the option of quitting at any point during the game after stepping up to $500.

Swap Meet - There is a prize shown to the contestant. Then, there are 3 more prizes shown and the contestant is to pick the prize that has the same price as the 1st prize shown to the contestant. The contestant doesn’t know the price of the first prize so it’s just a guess. If the contestant picks the correct prize, then he/she wins all 4 prizes.

Switch? – There are 2 prizes shown with 1 price tag in front of each prize. The contestant is to decide whether the prices of the prizes should be switched or if they should be left alone. If the contestant makes the correct decision, then he/she wins the prizes.

Switcheroo – 5 prizes, a car and four small prizes ($10-$100) are offered and their prices are listen on a board with the tens digit missing.  There are five blue blocks and the contestant must put the blocks in the correct prize’s empty slot.  The person is shown how many he/she got correct, and then he/she is offered a chance to switch his/her choice.  After the two switches, the contestant wins whichever prize is correct.

Take Two – Four prizes are shown (sofa, cradle, etc.) and a total price of two of the prizes combined.  It is the contestant’ job to seslect which two prizes are added together to add up to the price.  Contestant has two chances.

Temptation – Played for a car.  Contestant is offered a car and then four smaller prizes, (globe, sofa, etc.) and the Beauties reveals the price of each prize.  The contestant must choose which digit from the price of the prize goes in the corresponding digit in the price of the car.  After the person has made his choices, Bob offers to give him all the smaller prizes, but he can’t go for the car, (hence the name “Temptation”).  If the contestant goes for the car and wins, he/she receives all five prizes but if the contestant goes for the car and loses, he/she receives zero prizes.

Ten Chances – A contestant is offered three different prizes, a two-digit prize, a three-digit prize, and a car.  The contestant is given three numbers, and must write the correct price of the two digit prize, using tow numbers (ex. 6-7-2 are given, $76 is the correct answer).  The person is then given four numbers and must write the correct price of the three-digit prize.  Finally the person is given five numbers, and must write the correct price of the car using all five digits.  The contestant has a total of ten chances to correctly guess all three prizes correct.

That’s Too Much! – This game is played for a car. There is a row of 10 prizes, shown to the contestant one at a time. The contestant is to choose the first price in the row that is over the actual retail price of the car. When the contestant feels that Bob has revealed the first price that is more than the actual retail price of the car, he/she says “that’s too much!” Then Bob asks if the contestant is correct and then the contestant either hears the buzzer meaning he/she is wrong or the dinging noise, meaning that he/she is correct. Either way, one of the beauties shows the actual retail price to the contestant. If the contestant is wrong, then Bob tells the contestant where he/she should have stopped. If correct, then the contestant wins the car.

Three Strikes – Played for more expensive vehicles.  The numbers in the price of the car are placed in a bag along with one red “strike.”  The contestant then draws numbers and tries to correctly guess which digit they are in the car.  If a contestant pulls out the strike, then he/she has one strike against him/her.  If the contestant draws and guesses the correct placement of all the numbers, he/she wins the car, but if he/she gets three strikes before filling all of the digits, the player loses.

Time is MoneyPlayed for a prize package and $500 in cash. The contestant is shown five grocery items. Nearby are three shelves. In order to win the prize package, the contestant is instructed to sort the five products by placing them on the appropriate shelf. Products under $3.00 must be placed on the bottom shelf. Products between $3.00 and $6.00 must be placed on the middle shelf. Any product over $6.00 must be placed on the top shelf. The contestant is given 15 seconds to do this. However, before he begins to sort, he is given a “voucher” that is worth either $500.00 or 15 seconds of additional playing time. If the contestant succeeds on the first try, he wins the prize package and he can trade in his voucher for $500. But if the contestant fails at the sorting, the contestant has two choices – he can either quit and cash in the voucher for $500, or if he wishes, trade it in for an additional 15 seconds of playing time to resort his items. If he succeeds at sorting the items correctly on the second try, he wins the prize package.

Triple Play – This game is played for 3 cars. The first car is usually the least expensive car and the 3rd is the most expensive, but that doesn’t really matter. There are 2 price tags shown for the 1st car and the contestant is to choose which price is closest to the actual retail price of the car without going over. If correct, then the contestant has a chance to win the 2nd car. There are 3 price tags to choose from for the 2nd car. If the contestant is correct again, then the contestant has a chance to win the 3rd car, therefore winning all 3 cars. If the contestant chooses correctly yet again, then he/she wins all 3 cars. The contestant wins either all 3 cars or none of them. It’s all a matter of guessing really.

Two For The Price of One - Two prizes are offered to the contestant.  The contestant is trying to get the price of the less expensive prize, which has 3 numbers in the price.  One of the numbers in the price is given to the contestant.  The given number is the contestant’s choice.  The contestant must choose the remaining 2 numbers.  After the contestant has chosen the numbers he/she believes are the correct remaining numbers, Bob will say to light up the price and 2 numbers will light up.  If the numbers that light up are the numbers that the contestant chose, then the contestant wins the prizes.

RETIRED:

Hit Me – This game is played the same as black jack.  If the contestant has the better black jack hand than the house, then he/she wins.  In the event of a tie, the contestant wins.  There are 6 grocery items and the contestant is to choose from those items.  The smart thing to do is pick the item that has a price listed that is 10 times more than the actual retail price and to choose the product that has the exact price listed, therefore getting an ace.  If the contestant gets a card worth 10 and an ace, then he/she is guaranteed to win.

On The SpotA new pricing game that debuted recently.  This game is played for a car.  The contestant is standing on a “spot” with 3 different paths to get off the spot, pink, yellow, and blue.  Each path has 3 prices listed.  Sometimes, a price is listed more than once, which gives the contestant an advantage.  There are 6 small prizes used in this game.  Lets say the contestant chooses the yellow path and the price on the first step is $69 and the contestant chooses the correct prize.  Then, the contestant would step onto the $69 step.  If the contestant chooses the incorrect prize for the next price listed, then he/she must step back to the “spot.”  Then, lets say the contestant was to choose the blue path and he/she chooses the correct prize for the first price listed.  Then, he/she would move forward to that first step.  Then, lets say the 2nd step has the price of $69.  Then, since the contestant has already chosen the correct prize for that price, he/she can move forward again onto the 2nd step.  If the contestant chooses the correct prize for the price listed on the 3rd and final step, then he/she is off “the spot” and wins the car.  The only way to lose this game is to pick an incorrect prize on all 3 paths.  All in all, this game should not be very difficult to win.

With help from CBS.com and Wikipedia

For an even MORE detailed pricing games directory, check out The COMPLETE Pricing Game Directory!

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